Tastybox Restaurant Highlight – Interview with Kaibara Preethy

Many people associate healthy food with high prices. One Phoenix restaurant aims to tackle these misconceptions by providing healthy meals in a fast food format. Tastybox lines 7th street and stands beside its sister restaurant, a coffee shop called Street Coffee. Tastybox utilizes the a boxed lunch format, otherwise known as a bento, to deliver affordable healthy food. I sat down with Tastybox owner Kaibara Preethy to discuss the restaurant’s background. The practising doctor has a passion for healthy food. Preethy wanted to create a restaurant that could rival fast food in flavor and efficiency.

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Blaze Radio Work

These are the only recorded shows I’ve been in that appear on BlazeRadioOnline. More will be added soon!

Oct. 5 Traffic Jam – https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4Cfd_DK5yXhNkdiUzJ3aVlYN0U/view

Sept. 28 Traffic Jam – https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4Cfd_DK5yXhc2VaZUhYOGMwQnM/view

Sept. 26 Press Pass (Co-Anchor) – http://blazeradioonline.com/press-pass-september-26th/

Sept. 12 Press Pass (Co-Anchor) – http://blazeradioonline.com/press-pass-september-12th/

Sept. 7 Traffic Jam – https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4Cfd_DK5yXhUmJCTGQzQXZLZmc/view

The importance of eating earnest

Healthy eating habits can lengthen life, lower depression and improve studies

We’ve all heard about the freshman 15. You leave home and pack off to college, hoping to grow your brain with new knowledge. Unfortunately, many of us also grow out a big gut from unhealthy eating habits.

Luckily, here at ASU, there are so many options for good food available that every Sun Devil can avoid eating poorly. It’s never too late to change your eating habits, which have a huge effect on your academics. Eating well can even improve academic performance and reduce depression.

Read the rest of my article at the State Press website!

This piece was originally published February 21, 2017.

Trans* allyship requires more than mere acceptance

Photo by Nancy Stone | Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune

Embracing abstraction empowers students to explore gender variance

When Caitlyn Jenner revealed that she is transgender, I was too young to understand the gravity of her transition. It was the first time I’d ever even heard of Bruce Jenner, let alone the concept of being trans*.

I had no idea of the importance of the trans asterisk, for example.

“I’m really committed to that star, that asterisk,” said Jack Halberstam, professor of American studies and ethnicity, gender studies and comparative literature at the University of Southern California.

Read the rest of this opinion column on gender variance and the Trans* event on-campus on the State Press website!

This article was originally published in the State Press on April 4, 2017.

ASU students can take steps to stay safe from surveillance

Photo by Hannah Franklin | The State Press

Don’t be Trumped by your paranoia: take precautions instead

When the first day of spring break unfolded, I stepped into the Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport with a positive attitude I usually find hard to muster in airports.

As I hurried through the masses of people, an advertisement caught my eye. “Protect yourself from cyber attacks,” the banner above me read, accompanied by a man’s face from the nose down wearing a suspicious smirk. He was sitting before a laptop, his fingers poised to commit a nefarious attack on an unsuspecting victim’s cyberspace.

Ever since I saw that banner, the issues of cybersecurity and surveillance have weighed heavily on my mind. From alleged Russian involvement in the 2016 election to Donald Trump accusing Barack Obama of wiretapping the White House, worries about third-party surveillance of private information are ubiquitous in our modern political climate.

Read the rest of my article at the State Press website!

This piece was originally published March 22, 2017.

Political weariness weakens your potential to incite change

PHOTO BY SERENA O’SULLIVAN

Student engagement is the key to unlocking your power as an American citizen

When I walked into Downtown Phoenix’s Westward Ho building on a crisp evening in late February, there was a spring in my step, fueled by my own self-confidence and pride.

I was walking into a forum of ASU faculty and students, ready to engage in a discussion of constitutionality and recent laws, and I was completely assured of my ability to understand, and even contribute, to the discussion.

Jonathan Koppell, dean of the College of Public Service and Community Solutions, hosted the “What is Constitutional?” event, a group discussion on the Constitution and recent executive orders.

Read the rest of my article at the State Press website!

This piece was originally published March 15, 2017.

Backlash against ‘Rogue One’ reflects a post-election America

No matter how far, far away it may seem, “Rogue One” hits close to home

One of the most laughably naive concepts my younger self believed was that fiction was an escape from reality. The truth is that politics and entertainment are inexorably intertwined.

Last night’s Oscars was peppered with politics throughout, from Gael García Bernal’s condemnation of Trump’s wall to Jimmy Kimmel’s mid-Oscar tweet noting that Donald Trump hadn’t taken to Twitter to address the Oscars.

Read the rest of my article at the State Press website!

This piece was originally published February 27, 2017.

“Lion” proves that multiculturalism is the king of the jungle

Photo by IMBD | Courtesy

In socially divisive times like these, stories like “Lion” remind us to treasure the gift of multiculturalism

As the #1 public university in the United States for International Students, ASU is home to students from all backgrounds. That being said, it’s still difficult for American-born students to visualize the experiences their international peers face.

As a 20-year-old woman who feels serious anxiety when lost in Downtown Phoenix, I wouldn’t have lasted a minute in five-year-old Saroo Brierley‘s shoes.

Read the rest of my article at the State Press website!

This piece was originally published February 13, 2017.

“Passengers” proves that even space explorers can’t escape sexism

Photo by IMDb.com | Courtesy

Earthly attitudes about women and gender roles tie down this spacebound romance

Although it takes place in the stars, “Passengers” is as tied down by age-old romantic tropes as any other blockbuster, preventing it from skyrocketing into cinematographic space as a trail-blazing film.

As college students, we are learning skills that will aid us in changing the world, but what beliefs and attitudes will we take with us? How will the preconceived notions we carry affect and shape our future?

Read the rest of this opinion column on “Passengers” on the State Press website!

This article was originally published in the State Press on February 6, 2017.

 

 

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